posts categorized asLaborOnline

Teaching Labor’s Story: A Mission and a Workshop #LAWCHA19

by on July 12, 2019

Ed: This is one of a series of conference notes from the recent LAWCHA conference. If you have reflections from one of the panels or plenaries, please send them along. 

Teaching Labor’s Story: A Mission and a Workshop

The Trump years and rise of white nationalism in the United States and Europe has given new urgency to the work of the Labor and Working-Class History Association and to democracy-loving historians.

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Representations of Workers , Unions, and Labor Conflict in 1950s America: #LAWCHA19

by on July 12, 2019

Ed: This is one of a series of conference notes from the recent LAWCHA conference. If you have reflections from one of the panels or plenaries, please send them along. 

Recap of #LAWCHA19 session:  “The Dramatic Media’s Representations of Workers , Unions, and Labor Conflict in 1950s America”

We were treated to a fascinating panel on historical representations of labor in the media “past and present” in a panel organized by David Witwer. 

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Social Reproduction as a Category for Labor History #LAWCHA19

by on July 12, 2019

Ed: This is one of a series of conference notes from the recent LAWCHA conference. If you have reflections from one of the panels or plenaries, please send them along. 

The LAWCHA conference roundtable, “Social Reproduction as a Category for Labor History,” was a well-attended interactive discussion of the past, present, and future of social reproduction within labor history.

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Doris Day as Babe Williams in Pajama Game

Doris Day: Working-Class Hero

by on May 26, 2019

Doris Day was one of the hardest working entertainers of the 1950s and 1960s, as well as one of the highest paid female singers/actresses of all time. Many of us probably associate Doris Day with a certain kind of middlebrow wholesomeness and mid-century glamour, but I believe that what made her so successful was her work ethic and her conception of herself as a humble worker—an ethos which had its roots in her upbringing in a German-American working-class community in Cincinnati.

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