posts categorized asLaborOnline

Don’t end DACA, pass comprehensive reform

by on September 18, 2017

In the summer of 2005, I was young undocumented immigrant, with little hope and few prospects for a dignified future. Having just graduated high school not long before, I watched as my friends began college, took their first full time jobs, or joined the military.

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Race AND Class, Then and Now

by on September 15, 2017

Just a few days after white supremacists marched in Charlottesville, my husband and I went to see Kathryn Bigelow’s film, Detroit. Set amid the 1967 uprising 50 years ago this summer, the film focuses primarily on the brutal torture and the murder of three black men by police officers that took place that week at the Algiers Motel.

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UnKoch My Campus

by on September 6, 2017

UnKoch My Campus works with passionate students, fiery faculty, and concerned community members to fight the corrupting influence of Koch brothers’ funding at over 300 universities across the country.

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It’s Time to Fire the “Union Boss”: Here’s Why

by on September 4, 2017

In case natural disaster, nuclear war, and unpredictable political leaders are not enough to keep us up at night, we remain under threat by an age-old specter: the menace of the “union boss.” Just this week a Newsmax headline screamed “Union Boss: Too Early for 2018 Targets,” while the Washington Times blared “Union boss Richard Trumka focused on retaking Trump’s Rust Belt states next year.”

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More Than A Picnic: A Lesson in Labor Day

by on September 4, 2017

Before there were Labor Day barbecues and Labor Day sales, there was Labor–workers in the 19th century pushing for an eight-hour day and safe conditions as the U.S. economy was transforming itself from one of small enterprises to one dominated by industrial corporations.

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Valuing a Lost Work Culture

by on September 1, 2017

Late last fall I visited Stoke-on Trent, a city in the North-West of England which was once the epicentre of the UK’s huge pottery industry, now fallen on decidedly hard times. Local artist and academic Neil Brownsword, who had begun his working life in the pottery trade, acted as my guide around the city and the various sites of its industry – some newly established small workshops suppling niche markets, but mostly I saw the abandoned remnants of a once great industry.

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