posts categorized asIn Memoriam

Robert Zieger, 1938 – 2013

by on August 30, 2013

LAWCHA mourns the loss of one of its founding members, Bob Zieger. Bob was one of LAWCHA’s first ever board members and has been with the organization since its founding in 1999. If you would like to contribute a remembrance, please send it to [email protected], with your name and affiliation, and we will post it here.

Read more →

Alfred F. Young, 1925 – 2012

by on August 30, 2012

Alfred F. Young, a pioneer of the “new labor history,” noted social historian of the early American nation, and a founding editor of Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas, died on November 6, 2012 at age 87. Many know him from his passionate and original investigation of the lives of working people, including The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution(2000), Masquerade: The Life and Times of Deborah Sampson, Continental Soldier (2005), and, most recently, as co-editor of a recent collection of essays, Revolutionary Founders: Rebels, Radicals and Reformers in the Making of the Nation (2012).

Read more →
Addie Wyatt

Addie Wyatt, 1924 – 2012

by on August 30, 2012

On March 28, 2012, the labor community lost Rev. Addie Wyatt, a true champion for working people and one of the most influential labor leaders of the twentieth century. For five decades, since the early 1950s, she dedicated her life to improving the lives of all working people, both within and outside of the workplace.

Read more →

Eric Taplin, 1925 – 2012

by on August 30, 2012

“My friend Eric Taplin, the foremost labour historian of Liverpool, has died of cancer aged 87. When, in 1960, he arrived in the city as a lecturer at the Liverpool College of Commerce, no serious research into the development of dockers’ trade unionism had been conducted.

Read more →

Eric Hobsbawm, 1917 – 2012

by on August 30, 2012

“Eric Hobsbawm, who died on October 1 at the age of 95, was perhaps the twentieth century’s preeminent historian and a life-long advocate of social justice. Born in Alexandria, Egypt, in 1917 to a British father and Austrian mother, he was educated in Vienna and Berlin.

Read more →

Larry Gibson, 1946 – 2012

by on August 30, 2012

From Brad Wood, Duke University:

At some point you’ve probably heard me talk about Larry Gibson. He was literally the last man standing on Kayford Mountain in southern West Virginia. The 500 people who once called the community home left as fast as they could when the coal companies started blowing it up.

Read more →

Eugene Genovese, 1930 – 2012

by on August 30, 2012

“As a teenager in Brooklyn, New York in the 1940s, Eugene Genovese recruited workers for the Communist Party. Educated at Columbia University, he became one of America’s greatest historians. He remained an avowed Marxist until his conversion to Roman Catholicism in December of 1996.

Read more →