James Gregory

posts and bio James Gregory

Jim Gregory is a Professor of History at the University of Washington and President of LAWCHA.

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Nancy MacLean on Democracy Now

by on July 1, 2017

Amy Goodman spoke with Duke University historian and former LAWCHA president Nancy MacLean, author of the new book, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America. MacLean uncovers the instrumental role the late libertarian economist James Buchanan played in the right’s campaign to eliminate unions, suppress voting and privatize schools.

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Judith Stein, 1940-2017

by on May 16, 2017

It is with a heavy heart that I forward the news that Judith Stein has passed
away after a long struggle with cancer. A dedicated member of LAWCHA, she was a
Distinguished Professor of History at City College and
Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the author of key books
and articles.

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It is About Time: LAWCHA’s Committee on Contingent Faculty

by on September 1, 2016

This blog introduces LAWCHA’s newest and most important initiative. Last year, with encouragement from past president Nancy MacLean, an ad hoc committee drafted proposals that the Board of Directors adopted at its April 2016 meeting, most importantly creating the Committee on Contingent Faculty which manages this blog.

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James Green, 1944-2016

by on June 27, 2016

With great sadness we mark the passing of James Green, former president of LAWCHA, scholar, activist, and mentor to countless labor historians. He died yesterday following a long battle with cancer.

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When Socialists Won Elections (and Where)

by on May 5, 2016

Bernie Sanders has come close. And in doing so he has demonstrated that in 2016 the label democratic socialist is no longer a third-rail in American politics. This makes it a good time to talk about American political history and to contemplate the socialist movement of a century ago, when socialists won elections in more than 350 cities and towns, when more than 380 weekly and daily newspapers affiliated with the Socialist Party, when socialism was popular in states and counties that now vote solidly conservative.

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