William Herbert

posts and bio William Herbert

William A. Herbert is a Distinguished Lecturer and Executive Director of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions at Hunter College. He is also a Faculty Associate at the Roosevelt House Institute of Public Policy. His scholarship and teaching focus on labor law, history, and policy. His recent book chapter on the history of public workers in New York City appeared in Joshua Freeman (ed.), City of Workers, City of Struggle: How Labor Movements Changed New York (Columbia University Press, 2019).

Research on Graduate Assistants & Right to Unionize Challenges NLRB proposed rule

by , on November 27, 2019

On November 20, 2019, National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions, Hunter College, City University of New York submitted comments to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in response to its proposed rule to exclude graduate assistants and student employees from coverage under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). 

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Organizing the Academy: Strategies and Structures

by on July 20, 2017

Legal history and labor law concepts are essential tools for analyzing structures of unionization and collective bargaining, and in developing effective strategies. Reductionism concerning labor law can lead to flawed analysis. This powerpoint presentation briefly reviews the history and concepts, and provides fresh data regarding new faculty and student employee unionization, and strikes (Powerpoint, 17-28).

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Collective Bargaining and Unit Composition

by on December 24, 2016

An important issue in collective bargaining, with significant consequences for contingent faculty, is unit composition. At the April 3-5, 2016 annual conference in New York City of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions, a panel discussed the impact that faculty composition can have on collective bargaining.

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