posts tagged aspolitics and labor

Remapping the American Left: A History of Radical Discontinuity

by on May 6, 2020

Duke University Press is allowing us to offer free access for three months to James Gregory’s provocative new essay  “Remapping the American Left: A History Of Radical Discontinuity.”

The essay is based on his Labor and Working Class History Association Presidential Address and derives from his Mapping American Social Movements Project, which has mapped the major social movements of the twentieth century including a great variety of campaigns, political projects, and media outlets.

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The Red Scare and Radical Unionism

by on November 29, 2019

One hundred years ago this November, a small army of federal agents, backed by police and vigilantes, launched the first of a series of incursions on radical groups that would come to be known as the Palmer Raids, after Attorney General A.

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Research on Graduate Assistants & Right to Unionize Challenges NLRB proposed rule

by , on November 27, 2019

On November 20, 2019, National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions, Hunter College, City University of New York submitted comments to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in response to its proposed rule to exclude graduate assistants and student employees from coverage under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). 

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Black Education, Racism, and Class: Reflections from a Charter High School Graduation

by on June 20, 2017

This May I attended the commencement ceremony for a young cousin who was one of 117 graduates from an overwhelmingly black charter high school in a south suburb of Chicago.  Launched in 2010, the school – which I will dub “South Charter High” – was the brainchild of black educators, and working-class and middle-class parents, a fair share of them former Chicagoans displaced from the city by urban redevelopment and a skyrocketing cost of living. 

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Clinton and Trump: Labor and the Election of 2016

by on November 17, 2016

Both the polling and the pundits’ predictions of a Clinton victory were wrong.

The reasons for Trump’s victory in part can be understood in relation to how each candidate appealed to labor and how they represented capital. It is necessary to take into account how Trump’s populist ideology prevailed over Clinton’s money machine.

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