posts tagged ascovid-19

Verónica Martínez-Matsuda on Her New Book, Migrant Citizenship

by on July 23, 2020

Our series of interviews with authors of new books in labor and working-class history continues with Verónica Martínez-Matsuda. The University of Pennsylvania Press published her Migrant Citizenship: Race, Rights, and Reform in the U.S. Farm Labor Camp Program in June. Martínez-Matsuda, an associate professor in the Department of Labor Relations, Law, and History at the Cornell ILR School, answered questions from Jacob Remes.

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Lecturer Organizing and COVID-19

by on July 21, 2020

The public health and economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic have exacerbated the problems with America’s two-tier system of college teaching.

Because most non-tenure track instructors make low wages, those fortunate enough to retain their jobs are unlikely to have the space or technology or support from home that they need to provide excellent instruction remotely.

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Two woman hospital workers stand behind bandaged children in beds, and a man sits next to them

Covid-19, the Halifax Explosion, and Crises of Care

by on May 5, 2020

One of the first principles of critical disaster studies is that disasters exist not as time-out-of-time, but as embedded in the times and places that produce them. Because disasters are part of history, not outside of it, they can bring into relief structures of society that were always there.

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Labor and COVID-19: An International Perspective

by on April 21, 2020

How can we examine COVID-19 crisis from a global labor perspective? Several hundred people tuned in on April 9, 2020, for a discussion on this topic. It’s a perspective you won’t hear on the mainstream media! This program was sponsored by the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University.

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