posts categorized asLaborOnline Features

Remapping the American Left: A History of Radical Discontinuity

by on May 6, 2020

Duke University Press is allowing us to offer free access for three months to James Gregory’s provocative new essay  “Remapping the American Left: A History Of Radical Discontinuity.”

The essay is based on his Labor and Working Class History Association Presidential Address and derives from his Mapping American Social Movements Project, which has mapped the major social movements of the twentieth century including a great variety of campaigns, political projects, and media outlets.

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Two woman hospital workers stand behind bandaged children in beds, and a man sits next to them

Covid-19, the Halifax Explosion, and Crises of Care

by on May 5, 2020

One of the first principles of critical disaster studies is that disasters exist not as time-out-of-time, but as embedded in the times and places that produce them. Because disasters are part of history, not outside of it, they can bring into relief structures of society that were always there.

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Labor and COVID-19: An International Perspective

by on April 21, 2020

How can we examine COVID-19 crisis from a global labor perspective? Several hundred people tuned in on April 9, 2020, for a discussion on this topic. It’s a perspective you won’t hear on the mainstream media! This program was sponsored by the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University.

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John Prine’s “Grandpa Was a Carpenter”

by on April 14, 2020

The great John Prine, a victim of the coronavirus last week, spent a career penning and performing songs about his own death, many of them winningly whimsical, from 1973’s “Please Don’t Bury Me” to 2018’s “When I Get to Heaven.” Prine’s vision of death was irreverent, and over a half-century of songwriting he optimistically anticipated an afterlife filled with wonderful encounters and experiences straight out of … well, the best John Prine songs.

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Class, Capitalism, and Coronovirus at Disney’s Newest Attraction

by on March 31, 2020

Last week the Coronavirus forced Disney to announce that its American parks are now closed indefinitely, resulting in the longest interruptions of any kind since they opened in 1955 (Disneyland) and 1965 (Walt Disney World). Disney has been on my mind because I made my first ever visit to Walt Disney World in Orlando on January 25th of this year, just as the first COVID 19 cases were being identified in the US.

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Class and the Challenge of COVID-19

by on March 19, 2020

COVID-19, the coronavirus that is spreading across the world, is wreaking havoc on working people and their families.  Weeks after it burst onto the world scene, the end of this deadly threat is still not in sight.  Although it is clear that its death toll will not begin to approximate that of the lethal 1918-19 worldwide Spanish Influenza epidemic, early indications are that COVID-19 could end up inflicting even more economic and political damage than that earlier pandemic. 

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